Circulating hyaluronan as a marker of endothelial glycocalyx damage in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease and dogs in a hypercoagulable state

Sara Lawrence-Mills*, Melanie J Hezzell, Sophie E Adamantos, Iris Chan, Kieran Borgeat, Jessie Rose Payne, Simon C Satchell, Gavin I Welsh, R R Foster, Natalie C Finch

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

The endothelial glycocalyx (eGlx) lines the luminal surface of endothelial cells, maintaining vascular health. Glycocalyx damage is pathophysiologically important in many diseases across species however few studies have investigated its breakdown in naturally occurring disease in dogs. The aims of the study were to investigate eGlx damage in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD) diagnosed on echocardiography, and dogs in a hypercoagulable state diagnosed using thromboelastography (TEG), by measuring serum hyaluronan concentrations. Serum hyaluronan was quantified in dogs with MMVD (n = 27), hypercoagulability (n = 21), and in healthy controls dogs (n = 18). Serum hyaluronan concentrations were measured using a commercially-available ELISA validated for use in dogs. Hyaluronan concentrations were compared among groups using Kruskal-Wallis tests, and post-hoc with Dunn’s tests. Serum hyaluronan concentrations (median [range]) were significantly increased in dogs with MMVD (62.4 [22.8–201] ng/mL; P = 0.031) and hypercoagulability (92.40 [16.9–247.6] ng/mL; P < 0.001) compared to controls (45.7 [8.7–80.2] ng/mL). Measurement of serum hyaluronan concentration offers a clinically applicable marker of eGlx health and suggests the presence of eGlx damage in dogs with MMVD and dogs in a hypercoagulable state.
Original languageEnglish
Article number105845
Number of pages4
JournalVeterinary Journal
Volume285
Early online date28 May 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 May 2022

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
Preliminary results were presented as an Abstract at the British Small Animal Veterinary Association Congress 2018 and the Southern European Veterinary Association Congress 2018. Support for travel to present the findings of the present study at scientific conferences was provided by MSD Animal Health. The Pet Blood Bank generously donated surplus blood samples from healthy donors. The authors would also like to thank all the staff at Langford Vets for their assistance with sample collection and storage. This work was supported by the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute, University of Bristol and the Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund (204813/Z/16/Z). In addition, Natalie Finch was funded by Wellcome Trust (104507/Z/14/Z).

Funding Information:
Preliminary results were presented as an Abstract at the British Small Animal Veterinary Association Congress 2018 and the Southern European Veterinary Association Congress 2018. Support for travel to present the findings of the present study at scientific conferences was provided by MSD Animal Health. The Pet Blood Bank generously donated surplus blood samples from healthy donors. The authors would also like to thank all the staff at Langford Vets for their assistance with sample collection and storage. This work was supported by the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute, University of Bristol and the Wellcome Trust Institutional Strategic Support Fund ( 204813/Z/16/Z ). In addition, Natalie Finch was funded by Wellcome Trust ( 104507/Z/14/Z ).

Publisher Copyright:
© 2022 The Authors

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