Claiming ownership in the technosciences: Patents, priority and productivity

Christine MacLeod*, Gregory Radick

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Intellectual property (IP) in and around the sciences is nowadays a matter of high public as well as historical interest. Here we propose an integrative concept of IP that, drawing upon insights scattered across decades of scholarship, forges from them a framework for a new style of historical research. This expanded concept of IP takes in patents, copyright and other legal instruments (or their surrogates)-IP in a narrow sense-but also other kinds of ownership claims relevant in the sciences-IP in a broad sense. The latter include priority claims and what are here called productivity claims, made when a body of theoretical principles is asserted to underpin useful techniques and technologies. Attention to the interaction of patent, priority and productivity claims promises to lead historians to new questions, answers, and sources, as attested in the papers gathered in this special issue, on three technosciences (electrical science, aeronautics, agricultural botany) in Great Britain in the decades around 1900. (C) 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)188-201
Number of pages14
JournalStudies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2013

Keywords

  • Intellectual property
  • Patents
  • Priority
  • Pure and applied science
  • Technoscience
  • Scientific identity
  • HISTORY-OF-SCIENCE
  • PUBLIC SCIENCE
  • UNITED-STATES
  • BRITAIN
  • 19TH-CENTURY
  • 20TH-CENTURY
  • TECHNOLOGY
  • ORIGINS

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