Climate Change and Arthropod Ectoparasites and Vectors of Veterinary Importance

Hannah Rose Vineer, Lauren Ellse, Richard Wall

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter in a book

Abstract

This chapter introduces some of the key concepts associated with climate change impacts in the context of ectoparasites and vectors of veterinary importance, particularly those associated with animal husbandry, using specific examples that have been the focus of significant research efforts - primarily ticks, mange mites and the blowfly Lucilia sericata. Climate change, and in particular climate warming, may make it more likely that tropical and subtropical species will establish in more temperate areas. Climate change may indirectly affect veterinary ectoparasites through changes in farmer or pet owner behaviours. Changes in husbandry can also be optimised to mitigate negative impacts of climate change on parasite risk and the incidence of disease. Predictive models have demonstrated the importance of husbandry as a driver of ectoparasite epidemiology and the impact of future changes in management strategies must be considered in climate impact assessments.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationClimate Change and Arthropod Ectoparasites and Vectors of Veterinary Importance
Place of PublicationChichester
PublisherJohn Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
Pages111
Number of pages125
ISBN (Electronic)9781119070894
ISBN (Print)9781119070900
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Dec 2016

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