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Clinical onset of atopic eczema: Results from 2 nationally representative British birth cohorts followed through midlife

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Clinical onset of atopic eczema : Results from 2 nationally representative British birth cohorts followed through midlife. / Abuabara, Katrina; Ye, Morgan; McCulloch, Charles E.; Sullivan, Alice; Margolis, David J.; Strachan, David P.; Paternoster, Lavinia; Yew, Yik Weng; Williams, Hywel C.; Langan, Sinéad M.

In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, Vol. 144, No. 3, 01.09.2019, p. 710-719.

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Harvard

Abuabara, K, Ye, M, McCulloch, CE, Sullivan, A, Margolis, DJ, Strachan, DP, Paternoster, L, Yew, YW, Williams, HC & Langan, SM 2019, 'Clinical onset of atopic eczema: Results from 2 nationally representative British birth cohorts followed through midlife', Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, vol. 144, no. 3, pp. 710-719. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2019.05.040

APA

Abuabara, K., Ye, M., McCulloch, C. E., Sullivan, A., Margolis, D. J., Strachan, D. P., ... Langan, S. M. (2019). Clinical onset of atopic eczema: Results from 2 nationally representative British birth cohorts followed through midlife. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 144(3), 710-719. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2019.05.040

Vancouver

Abuabara K, Ye M, McCulloch CE, Sullivan A, Margolis DJ, Strachan DP et al. Clinical onset of atopic eczema: Results from 2 nationally representative British birth cohorts followed through midlife. Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2019 Sep 1;144(3):710-719. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaci.2019.05.040

Author

Abuabara, Katrina ; Ye, Morgan ; McCulloch, Charles E. ; Sullivan, Alice ; Margolis, David J. ; Strachan, David P. ; Paternoster, Lavinia ; Yew, Yik Weng ; Williams, Hywel C. ; Langan, Sinéad M. / Clinical onset of atopic eczema : Results from 2 nationally representative British birth cohorts followed through midlife. In: Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology. 2019 ; Vol. 144, No. 3. pp. 710-719.

Bibtex

@article{b8dddacd7cec4db2b822113d00bc7797,
title = "Clinical onset of atopic eczema: Results from 2 nationally representative British birth cohorts followed through midlife",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema onset is described primarily in early childhood; the frequency and characteristics of adult-onset disease remain controversial.OBJECTIVE: To determine the proportion of individuals who report atopic eczema symptoms between birth and mid adulthood, and to examine demographic, immunologic, and genetic factors associated with period of symptom onset.METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal study using data from two nationally representative community-based birth cohorts from the United Kingdom: the British Cohort Studies 1958 and 1970. Individuals were followed from birth through age 42-50. The primary outcome was the age period of self-reported atopic eczema symptom onset based on repeated measures of self-reported atopic eczema at each survey wave.RESULTS: The annual period prevalence of atopic eczema ranged from 5-15{\%} in two cohorts of over 17,000 participants each followed from birth through mid-age. There was no clear trend in prevalence by age, and among adults reporting active atopic eczema during a given year, only 38{\%} had symptom onset reported in childhood. When compared with individuals whose eczema started in childhood, those with adult-onset disease were more likely to be women, from Scotland or Northern England, of lower childhood socio-economic group, smokers in adulthood, and less likely to have a history of asthma. In a sub-analysis using data from the 1958 cohort only, genetic mutations previously associated with atopic eczema, including filaggrin null mutations, and allergen-specific IgE were more common among those with childhood-onset disease.CONCLUSION: Rates of self-reported atopic eczema remain high after childhood, and adult-onset atopic eczema has different risk factor associations than childhood-onset eczema.",
keywords = "atopic dermatitis, atopic eczema, epidemiology, natural history",
author = "Katrina Abuabara and Morgan Ye and McCulloch, {Charles E.} and Alice Sullivan and Margolis, {David J.} and Strachan, {David P.} and Lavinia Paternoster and Yew, {Yik Weng} and Williams, {Hywel C.} and Langan, {Sin{\'e}ad M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jaci.2019.05.040",
language = "English",
volume = "144",
pages = "710--719",
journal = "Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology",
issn = "0091-6749",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "3",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Clinical onset of atopic eczema

T2 - Results from 2 nationally representative British birth cohorts followed through midlife

AU - Abuabara, Katrina

AU - Ye, Morgan

AU - McCulloch, Charles E.

AU - Sullivan, Alice

AU - Margolis, David J.

AU - Strachan, David P.

AU - Paternoster, Lavinia

AU - Yew, Yik Weng

AU - Williams, Hywel C.

AU - Langan, Sinéad M.

PY - 2019/9/1

Y1 - 2019/9/1

N2 - BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema onset is described primarily in early childhood; the frequency and characteristics of adult-onset disease remain controversial.OBJECTIVE: To determine the proportion of individuals who report atopic eczema symptoms between birth and mid adulthood, and to examine demographic, immunologic, and genetic factors associated with period of symptom onset.METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal study using data from two nationally representative community-based birth cohorts from the United Kingdom: the British Cohort Studies 1958 and 1970. Individuals were followed from birth through age 42-50. The primary outcome was the age period of self-reported atopic eczema symptom onset based on repeated measures of self-reported atopic eczema at each survey wave.RESULTS: The annual period prevalence of atopic eczema ranged from 5-15% in two cohorts of over 17,000 participants each followed from birth through mid-age. There was no clear trend in prevalence by age, and among adults reporting active atopic eczema during a given year, only 38% had symptom onset reported in childhood. When compared with individuals whose eczema started in childhood, those with adult-onset disease were more likely to be women, from Scotland or Northern England, of lower childhood socio-economic group, smokers in adulthood, and less likely to have a history of asthma. In a sub-analysis using data from the 1958 cohort only, genetic mutations previously associated with atopic eczema, including filaggrin null mutations, and allergen-specific IgE were more common among those with childhood-onset disease.CONCLUSION: Rates of self-reported atopic eczema remain high after childhood, and adult-onset atopic eczema has different risk factor associations than childhood-onset eczema.

AB - BACKGROUND: Atopic eczema onset is described primarily in early childhood; the frequency and characteristics of adult-onset disease remain controversial.OBJECTIVE: To determine the proportion of individuals who report atopic eczema symptoms between birth and mid adulthood, and to examine demographic, immunologic, and genetic factors associated with period of symptom onset.METHODS: We conducted a longitudinal study using data from two nationally representative community-based birth cohorts from the United Kingdom: the British Cohort Studies 1958 and 1970. Individuals were followed from birth through age 42-50. The primary outcome was the age period of self-reported atopic eczema symptom onset based on repeated measures of self-reported atopic eczema at each survey wave.RESULTS: The annual period prevalence of atopic eczema ranged from 5-15% in two cohorts of over 17,000 participants each followed from birth through mid-age. There was no clear trend in prevalence by age, and among adults reporting active atopic eczema during a given year, only 38% had symptom onset reported in childhood. When compared with individuals whose eczema started in childhood, those with adult-onset disease were more likely to be women, from Scotland or Northern England, of lower childhood socio-economic group, smokers in adulthood, and less likely to have a history of asthma. In a sub-analysis using data from the 1958 cohort only, genetic mutations previously associated with atopic eczema, including filaggrin null mutations, and allergen-specific IgE were more common among those with childhood-onset disease.CONCLUSION: Rates of self-reported atopic eczema remain high after childhood, and adult-onset atopic eczema has different risk factor associations than childhood-onset eczema.

KW - atopic dermatitis

KW - atopic eczema

KW - epidemiology

KW - natural history

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85071237235&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jaci.2019.05.040

DO - 10.1016/j.jaci.2019.05.040

M3 - Article

C2 - 31260715

VL - 144

SP - 710

EP - 719

JO - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

JF - Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology

SN - 0091-6749

IS - 3

ER -