Co-Managers or Co-Residents? Indigenous Peoples’ Participation in the Management of Protected Areas: A Case Study of the Agta in the Philippines

Katie Major*, Daniel Smith, Andrea Bamberg Migliano

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
173 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Indigenous peoples’ participation in the co-management of protected areas is recognised as essential for conserving both cultural and biological diversity. While this practice is increasingly common, few studies have quantitatively evaluated the efficacy of these initiatives. Here we examine levels of knowledge and involvement among the Agta, a hunter-gatherer population who co-manage the Northern Sierra Madre Natural Park, the largest protected area in the Philippines. We find that the Agta generally possess low levels of knowledge about the protected area they are supposed to co-manage. Participation in park management is hampered by several factors, including a lack of cultural sensitivity regarding the Agta’s foraging lifestyle among park officials and little political will to realistically empower and support the Agta as co-managers. Recommendations to strengthen Agta participation – and indigenous peoples’ participation in protected area management more widely – are made to help protect the world’s remaining cultural and biological diversity.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)485-495
Number of pages11
JournalHuman Ecology
Volume46
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 28 Jun 2018

Keywords

  • Indigenous peoples
  • Co-management
  • Protected areas
  • Agta
  • Philippines
  • Conservation

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