Communities, Audiences, and Multi-localities: British cultural policy and the showcasing of South Asian art’

M Bolognani

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The development of South Asian arts in the UK has gone from using typical colonial and 'high culture' showcases to using particular but still far more 'mainstream' formats, and has been publicly subsidised in a number of ways, including through community projects. In many respects, South Asian arts is not a 'niche product' any more due to the (mainly political) tension towards creating a distinctively 'British Asian' (or BrAsian) rather than a strictly 'South Asian' product. This paper draws upon two case studies of South Asian 'cultural producers' (Dudrah 'Cultural Production' 223) in Northern England to argue that showcasing South Asian art in Britain is a peculiar endeavour, the existence of which must account for multiple functions, multiple audiences and even international politics. The paper argues that recognising this fact has profound implications for the future of British Asian identities and for the negotiation between popular culture and politics.
Translated title of the contributionCommunities, Audiences, and Multi-localities: British cultural policy and the showcasing of South Asian art’
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)71 - 80
Number of pages10
JournalSouth Asian Popular Culture
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2011

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Routledge (Taylor Francis Group)

Structured keywords

  • SPAIS Centre for the Study of Ethnicity and Citizenship

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Communities, Audiences, and Multi-localities: British cultural policy and the showcasing of South Asian art’'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this