Comparative analysis of c-kit gene expression and c-Kit immunoreactivity in horses with and without obstructive intestinal disease

C Fintl, GT Pearson, IG Mayhew, C Stewart Lowden, PA Hopwood, CJ Palgrave, CJ Proudman, G Barrie Edwards, SE Taylor, NP Hudson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Previous immunohistochemical studies targeting the receptor tyrosine kinase (c-Kit) have demonstrated an apparent reduction in the number of gastrointestinal pacemaker cells--the interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC)--in horses with intestinal motility disorders. This study compared the level of transcription of the c-kit gene encoding this receptor in horses with and without such motility disorders. Transcription levels of this gene were also compared to the density of ICC immunohistochemically positive for the c-Kit antigen. Intestinal samples were collected from 18 horses with intestinal disease and from 15 control animals. Following gene extraction and identification, real-time quantitative analysis of c-kit and a control gene, ACTB (β-actin), was carried out on all samples and the density of the c-Kit-positive ICC compared. There was a significant reduction in c-Kit immunoreactivity in the ICC of horses with large intestinal obstructive disorders relative to controls but no significant difference in the transcription of the c-kit gene between normal and affected animals. Further studies will be required to elucidate the mechanisms regulating c-Kit expression and to assess the pathophysiological significance of these findings.
Translated title of the contributionComparative analysis of c-kit gene expression and c-Kit immunoreactivity in horses with and without obstructive intestinal disease
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)64 - 69
Number of pages6
JournalVeterinary Journal
Volume186(1)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2010

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