Comparing the Consistency of Atom Probe Tomography Measurements of Small-Scale Segregation and Clustering between the LEAP 3000 and LEAP 5000 Instruments

Tomas L. Martin*, Andrew J. London, Benjamin Jenkins, Sarah E. Hopkin, James O. Douglas, Paul D. Styman, Paul A.J. Bagot, Michael P. Moody

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

5 Citations (Scopus)
246 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The local electrode atom probe (LEAP) has become the primary instrument used for atom probe tomography measurements. Recent advances in detector and laser design, together with updated hit detection algorithms, have been incorporated into the latest LEAP 5000 instrument, but the implications of these changes on measurements, particularly the size and chemistry of small clusters and elemental segregations, have not been explored. In this study, we compare data sets from a variety of materials with small-scale chemical heterogeneity using both a LEAP 3000 instrument with 37% detector efficiency and a 532-nm green laser and a new LEAP 5000 instrument with a manufacturer estimated increase to 52% detector efficiency, and a 355-nm ultraviolet laser. In general, it was found that the number of atoms within small clusters or surface segregation increased in the LEAP 5000, as would be expected by the reported increase in detector efficiency from the LEAP 3000 architecture, but subtle differences in chemistry were observed which are attributed to changes in the way multiple hit detection is calculated using the LEAP 5000.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)227-237
Number of pages11
JournalMicroscopy and Microanalysis
Volume23
Issue number2
Early online date26 Apr 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2017

Keywords

  • atom probe tomography
  • clustering
  • detector efficiency
  • small-scale segregation
  • steel

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