Congruity effects evoked by subliminally presented primes: Automaticity rather than semantic processing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

In a size judgment task on words denoting concrete objects, subliminally presented stimuli that preceded the targets influenced response times and were dependent on whether responses to the prime and the target were congruent or incongruent (Experiment 1). These findings, mirroring S. Dehaene et al. (1998), imply that primes are unconsciously categorized and processed to the response stage. However, the effect does not generalize to primes that are not in the response set (Experiment 2), and even exposure to primes not in the response set in an interleaved naming-size judgment task fails to induce it (Experiment 3). However, the effect generalizes from lowercase primes to the same set of uppercase targets (Experiment 4), suggesting an abstract level of operation. The findings suggest that rather than resulting from unconscious prime categorization, the congruity effect results from automatized stimulus-response mappings. Potential differences between the number and the word domain are discussed.
Translated title of the contributionCongruity effects evoked by subliminally presented primes: Automaticity rather than semantic processing
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)154 - 165
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Volume27 (1)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2001

Bibliographical note

Publisher: American Psychological Association

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