Connecting spiking neurons to a spiking memristor network changes the memristor dynamics

Deborah Gater, Attya Iqbal, Jeffrey Davey, Ella Gale

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Memristors have been suggested as neuromorphic computing elements. Spike-time dependent plasticity and the Hodgkin-Huxley model of the neuron have both been modelled effectively by memristor theory. The d.c. response of the memris-tor is a current spike. Based on these three facts we suggest that memristors are well-placed to interface directly with neurons. In this paper we show that connecting a spiking memristor network to spiking neuronal cells causes a change in the memristor network dynamics by: causing a change in current decay rate consistent with a change in memristor state; presenting more-linear I-t dynamics; and increasing the memristor spiking rate, as a consequence of interaction with the spiking neurons. This demonstrates that neurons are capable of communicating directly with memristors, without the need for computer translation.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2013 IEEE 20th International Conference on Electronics, Circuits, and Systems, ICECS 2013
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE)
Pages534-537
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)9781479924523
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2013
Event2013 IEEE 20th International Conference on Electronics, Circuits, and Systems, ICECS 2013 - Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates
Duration: 8 Dec 201311 Dec 2013

Conference

Conference2013 IEEE 20th International Conference on Electronics, Circuits, and Systems, ICECS 2013
CountryUnited Arab Emirates
CityAbu Dhabi
Period8/12/1311/12/13

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