Conservation on international boundaries: the impact of security barriers on selected terrestrial mammals in four protected areas in Arizona, USA.

Jamie W McCallum, J Marcus Rowcliffe, Innes C Cuthill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)
286 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Several thousand terrestrial protected areas (PAs) lie on international boundaries. Because international boundaries can be focal points for trade, illegal activity and development, such PAs can be vulnerable to a range of anthropogenic threats. There is an increasing trend towards the erection of international boundary infrastructure (including fences, barriers and ditches) in many parts of the world, which may reduce the risk of these anthropogenic threats to some PAs. However this may restrict home range and access to resources for some native species. We sought to understand the impacts of these two different types of threat by using camera traps to measure the activity level of humans, native and invasive mammals in four US PAs on the Mexican international boundary. Comparisons were made between treatment areas with barriers and those without. Results showed that puma and coati were more likely to appear in treatment areas without barriers, whereas humans were not observed more frequently in one treatment area over another. The suggestion is that the intermittent fencing present in this part of the world does affect some native species, but does not necessarily restrict the movement of humans (including illegal migrants), who may negatively impact native species.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere93679
Number of pages11
JournalPLoS ONE
Volume9
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 Apr 2014

Keywords

  • conservation
  • transboundary conservation
  • international borders
  • camera trapping
  • Panthera pardus

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Conservation on international boundaries: the impact of security barriers on selected terrestrial mammals in four protected areas in Arizona, USA.'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this