Contrasting patterns of resource exploitation on the Outer Hebrides and Northern Isles of Scotland during the Late Iron Age and Norse period revealed through organic residues in pottery.

Lucy J E Cramp, Helen L Whelton, Niall Sharples, Jacqui Mulville, Richard P Evershed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

This paper presents the findings from an investigation of organic residues extracted from pottery sherds from Late Iron Age and Norse phases from Bornais, South Uist, and the Late Norse period from Jarlshof on Shetland. These data confirm intensive and/or specialised processing of marine products in pottery on Shetland, either for consumption or other uses, such as rendering of oil from fish livers. In contrast, at Bornais, little increase in the intensity of marine product exploitation can be identified between the residues from the Later Iron Age and Norse phases; however, an emphasis on dairy products is identifiable throughout all phases and pottery types. Whilst the findings from these two sites clearly cannot be extrapolated as entirely representative of the wider respective regions, what emerges is further evidence for diverse economic or cultural patterns at different locations within Scandinavian Scotland.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of the North Atlantic
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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