Controlled reoxygenation during cardiopulmonary bypass decreases markers of organ damage, inflammation, and oxidative stress in single-ventricle patients undergoing pediatric heart surgery

Massimo Caputo, Amir Mokhtari, Antonio Miceli, Mohamed T Ghorbel, Gianni D Angelini, Andrew J Parry, Saadeh M Suleiman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Single-ventricle patients undergoing pediatric heart surgery are a high-risk group owing to reoxygenation injury during cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). The present study investigated the effects of controlled reoxygenation CPB on biomarkers of organ damage, inflammation, stress, and long-term functional outcomes in cyanotic patients with either a single or double ventricle during open heart surgery.

METHODS: Cyanotic patients with either a single (n = 32) or double (n = 47) ventricle undergoing surgical correction were randomized to receive CPB using either standard oxygen levels or controlled reoxygenation. The markers of cardiac injury, inflammation, stress, and cerebral and hepatic injury were measured preoperatively, at 10 and 30 minutes after starting CPB, and at 10 minutes and 4 and 24 hours after CPB. The data were analyzed using a mixed regression model.

RESULTS: No difference was found in the pre- or intraoperative characteristics between the standard and controlled reoxygenation CPB groups for single- or double-ventricle patients. In the single-ventricle patients, controlled reoxygenation CPB significantly (P < .05) decreased the markers of organ damage, inflammation, stress, and oxidative stress. In contrast, the markers of inflammation and cardiac injury were not altered by controlled reoxygenation CPB in the double-ventricle patients.

CONCLUSIONS: Controlled reoxygenation CPB decreased the markers of organ damage, stress, inflammation, and oxidative stress in single-ventricle patients undergoing cardiac surgery.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)792-801.e8
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume148
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

Structured keywords

  • Centre for Surgical Research

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Controlled reoxygenation during cardiopulmonary bypass decreases markers of organ damage, inflammation, and oxidative stress in single-ventricle patients undergoing pediatric heart surgery'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this