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Core information set for informed consent to surgery for oral or oropharyngeal cancer: A mixed-methods study

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Core information set for informed consent to surgery for oral or oropharyngeal cancer : A mixed-methods study. / Main, Barry; McNair, Angus; Haworth, Simon; Rooshenas, Leila; Hughes, C W ; Tierney, P; Donovan, Jenny; Thomas, Steve; Blazeby, Jane.

In: Clinical Otolaryngology, Vol. 43, No. 2, 01.04.2018, p. 624-631.

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@article{76d155f905ce4adea675d8540f1e06f8,
title = "Core information set for informed consent to surgery for oral or oropharyngeal cancer: A mixed-methods study",
abstract = "Objectives: To develop a core information set for informed consent to surgery for oral/oropharyngeal surgery. A core information set is baseline information rated important by patients and surgeons and is intended to improve patients' understanding of the intended procedure. Design: A mixed-methods study. Systematic reviews of scientific and written healthcare literature, qualitative interviews and observations, Delphi surveys, and group consensus meetings identified information domains of importance for consent. Setting: A regional head and neck clinic in the United Kingdom. Questionnaire participants were recruited from around the UK. Participants: Patients about to undergo, or who had previously undergone, surgery for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Healthcare professionals involved in the management of head and neck cancer. Main outcome measures: The main outcome was a core information set. Results: Systematic reviews, interviews and consultation observations yielded 887 pieces of information that were categorised into 87 information domains. Survey response rates were 67% (n = 50) and 71% (n = 52) for patient and healthcare professional groups in round one. More than 90% responded in each group in the second round. Healthcare professionals were more likely to rate information about short-term or peri-operative events as important while patients rated longer term issues about survival and quality of life. The consensus-building process resulted in an agreed core information set of 13 domains plus two procedure-specific domains about tracheostomy and free-flap surgery. Conclusion: This study produced a core information set for surgeons and patients to discuss before surgery for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Future work will optimise ways to integrate core information into routine consultations.",
author = "Barry Main and Angus McNair and Simon Haworth and Leila Rooshenas and Hughes, {C W} and P Tierney and Jenny Donovan and Steve Thomas and Jane Blazeby",
year = "2018",
month = apr,
day = "1",
doi = "10.1111/coa.13037",
language = "English",
volume = "43",
pages = "624--631",
journal = "Clinical Otolaryngology",
issn = "1749-4478",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "2",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Core information set for informed consent to surgery for oral or oropharyngeal cancer

T2 - A mixed-methods study

AU - Main, Barry

AU - McNair, Angus

AU - Haworth, Simon

AU - Rooshenas, Leila

AU - Hughes, C W

AU - Tierney, P

AU - Donovan, Jenny

AU - Thomas, Steve

AU - Blazeby, Jane

PY - 2018/4/1

Y1 - 2018/4/1

N2 - Objectives: To develop a core information set for informed consent to surgery for oral/oropharyngeal surgery. A core information set is baseline information rated important by patients and surgeons and is intended to improve patients' understanding of the intended procedure. Design: A mixed-methods study. Systematic reviews of scientific and written healthcare literature, qualitative interviews and observations, Delphi surveys, and group consensus meetings identified information domains of importance for consent. Setting: A regional head and neck clinic in the United Kingdom. Questionnaire participants were recruited from around the UK. Participants: Patients about to undergo, or who had previously undergone, surgery for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Healthcare professionals involved in the management of head and neck cancer. Main outcome measures: The main outcome was a core information set. Results: Systematic reviews, interviews and consultation observations yielded 887 pieces of information that were categorised into 87 information domains. Survey response rates were 67% (n = 50) and 71% (n = 52) for patient and healthcare professional groups in round one. More than 90% responded in each group in the second round. Healthcare professionals were more likely to rate information about short-term or peri-operative events as important while patients rated longer term issues about survival and quality of life. The consensus-building process resulted in an agreed core information set of 13 domains plus two procedure-specific domains about tracheostomy and free-flap surgery. Conclusion: This study produced a core information set for surgeons and patients to discuss before surgery for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Future work will optimise ways to integrate core information into routine consultations.

AB - Objectives: To develop a core information set for informed consent to surgery for oral/oropharyngeal surgery. A core information set is baseline information rated important by patients and surgeons and is intended to improve patients' understanding of the intended procedure. Design: A mixed-methods study. Systematic reviews of scientific and written healthcare literature, qualitative interviews and observations, Delphi surveys, and group consensus meetings identified information domains of importance for consent. Setting: A regional head and neck clinic in the United Kingdom. Questionnaire participants were recruited from around the UK. Participants: Patients about to undergo, or who had previously undergone, surgery for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Healthcare professionals involved in the management of head and neck cancer. Main outcome measures: The main outcome was a core information set. Results: Systematic reviews, interviews and consultation observations yielded 887 pieces of information that were categorised into 87 information domains. Survey response rates were 67% (n = 50) and 71% (n = 52) for patient and healthcare professional groups in round one. More than 90% responded in each group in the second round. Healthcare professionals were more likely to rate information about short-term or peri-operative events as important while patients rated longer term issues about survival and quality of life. The consensus-building process resulted in an agreed core information set of 13 domains plus two procedure-specific domains about tracheostomy and free-flap surgery. Conclusion: This study produced a core information set for surgeons and patients to discuss before surgery for oral/oropharyngeal cancer. Future work will optimise ways to integrate core information into routine consultations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85038851445&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1111/coa.13037

DO - 10.1111/coa.13037

M3 - Article (Academic Journal)

C2 - 29178168

AN - SCOPUS:85038851445

VL - 43

SP - 624

EP - 631

JO - Clinical Otolaryngology

JF - Clinical Otolaryngology

SN - 1749-4478

IS - 2

ER -