Cost-effectiveness modelling of telehealth for patients with raised cardiovascular disease risk: evidence from a cohort simulation conducted alongside the Healthlines randomised controlled trial

Padraig Dixon, Sandra Hollinghurst, Roberta Ara, Louisa Edwards, Alexis Foster, Chris Salisbury

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

Objectives

To investigate the long-term cost-effectiveness (measured as the ratio of incremental NHS cost to incremental quality-adjusted life years) of a telehealth intervention for patients with raised cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk.

Design

A cohort simulation model developed as part of the economic evaluation conducted alongside the Healthlines randomised controlled trial.

Setting

Patients recruited through primary care, and intervention delivered via telehealth service.

Participants

Participants with a 10-year CVD risk ≥20%, as measured by the QRISK2 algorithm, and with at least 1 modifiable risk factor, individually randomised from 42 general practices in England.

Intervention

A telehealth service delivered over a 12-month period. The intervention involved a series of responsive, theory-led encounters between patients and trained health information advisors who provided access to information resources and supported medication adherence and coordination of care.

Primary and secondary outcome measures

Cost-effectiveness measured by net monetary benefit over the simulated lifetime of trial participants from a UK National Health Service perspective.

Results

The probability that the intervention was cost-effective depended on the duration of the effect of the intervention. The intervention was cost-effective with high probability if effects persisted over the lifetime of intervention recipients. The probability of cost-effectiveness was lower for shorter durations of effect.

Conclusions

The intervention was likely to be cost-effective under a lifetime perspective.
Original languageEnglish
Article numbere012355
Number of pages9
JournalBMJ Open
Volume6
Issue number9
Early online date26 Aug 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2016

Structured keywords

  • BTC (Bristol Trials Centre)
  • BRTC

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