Craniofacial characteristics of successful responders to mandibular advancement splint therapy: a pilot study

Jadbinder Seehra, Martyn Sherriff, Lindsay Winchester

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cephalometric variables that can be used to identify patients with obstructive sleep apnoea who are suitable for mandibular advancement splints and surgical maxillomandibular advancement are lacking. The aim of this pilot study was to describe the craniofacial characteristics of patients whose symptoms of obstructive sleep apnoea were successfully treated with mandibular advancement splints and who were subsequently considered for maxillomandibular advancement. We retrospectively compared the craniofacial characteristics of our patients with data from 2 previously published studies. There were significant differences between the 2 groups for ANB (p<0.000), overjet (p<0.0001), Go-Me (p<0.0002), and ANS-PNS (p<0.0009). Patients, whose symptoms improve with the use of mandibular advancement splints and are potential candidates for maxillomandibular advancement, may have unique craniofacial features consisting of bimaxillary retrusion characterised by a shorter maxilla and mandible, and a greater class II skeletal tendency. The results of this study should be viewed as a pilot. Further research is required.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)314-6
Number of pages3
JournalBritish Journal of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery
Volume52
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2014

Bibliographical note

Copyright © 2014 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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