Culotte stenting for coronary bifurcation lesions with 2nd and 3rd generation everolimus-eluting stents: the CELTIC Bifurcation Study

Simon J Walsh, Colm G Hanratty, Stuart Watkins, Keith G Oldroyd, Niall T Mulvihill, Mark Hensey, Alex Chase, Dave Smith, Nick Cruden, James C Spratt, Darren Mylotte, Tom Johnson, Jonathan Hill, Hafiz M Hussein, Kris Bogaerts, Marie-Claude Morice, David P Foley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

Abstract

AIMS: The aim of this study was to provide contemporary outcome data for patients with de novo coronary disease and Medina 1,1,1 lesions who were treated with a culotte two-stent technique, and to compare the performance of two modern-generation drug-eluting stent (DES) platforms, the 3-connector XIENCE and the 2-connector SYNERGY.

METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with Medina 1,1,1 bifurcation lesions who had disease that was amenable to culotte stenting were randomised 1:1 to treatment with XIENCE or SYNERGY DES. A total of 170 patients were included. Technical success and final kissing balloon inflation occurred in >96% of cases. Major adverse cardiovascular or cerebrovascular events (MACCE: a composite of death, myocardial infarction [MI], cerebrovascular accident [CVA] and target vessel revascularisation [TVR]) occurred in 5.9% of patients by nine months. The primary endpoint was a composite of death, MI, CVA, target vessel failure (TVF), stent thrombosis and binary angiographic restenosis. At nine months, the primary endpoint occurred in 19% of XIENCE patients and 16% of SYNERGY patients (p=0.003 for non-inferiority for platform performance).

CONCLUSIONS: MACCE rates for culotte stenting using contemporary everolimus-eluting DES are low at nine months. The XIENCE and SYNERGY stents demonstrated comparable performance for the primary endpoint.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)e318-e324
JournalEurointervention
Volume14
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Jun 2018

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