Democratising policy theories: enhancing prospects for language justice for Sign Language Peoples

SCE Batterbury

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

    3 Citations (Scopus)
    379 Downloads (Pure)

    Abstract

    The paper argues that policy-makers in the UK do not perceive Sign Language Peoples (SLPs) as a minority language formation. Policies are based on an assumption of disability and deliver unsatisfactory outcomes that struggle to address linguistic exclusion. Multicultural polices incorporating SLPs’ perspectives would offer greater synergy between policy theory and SLP’s lived-experience. More specifically, democratisation of the policy formulation process could lead to achievement of greater social justice for SLPs. Looking forward, the power of transnational networks to provoke national policy change offers a possible way of breaking through existing UK discourse barriers to more democratic SLP-led policy formulation
    Translated title of the contributionSocial Justice, Language Policy and British Sign Language: The Deaf Perspective
    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)547-564
    Number of pages18
    JournalPolicy and Politics
    Volume42
    Issue number4
    Early online date1 Oct 2014
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - Oct 2014

    Bibliographical note

    submitted, waiting editors feedback on minor corrections.

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