Developing a universal model of reading necessitates cracking the orthographic code

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Abstract

I argue, contra Frost, that when prime lexicality and target density are considered, it is not clear that there are fundamental differences between form priming effects in Semitic and European languages. Furthermore, identifying and naming printed words in these languages raises common theoretical problems. Solving these problems and developing a universal model of reading necessitates “cracking” the orthographic input code.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)283-284
JournalBehavioral and Brain Sciences
Volume35
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2012

Bibliographical note

Published online: August 2012

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