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Diamond-coated ‘black silicon’ as a promising material for high-surface-area electrochemical electrodes and antibacterial surfaces

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)5737-5746
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Materials Chemistry B
Volume34
Issue number34
Early online date8 Aug 2016
DOIs
DateAccepted/In press - 8 Aug 2016
DateE-pub ahead of print - 8 Aug 2016
DatePublished (current) - 14 Sep 2016

Abstract

This report describes a method to fabricate high-surface-area boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrodes using so-called ‘black silicon’ (bSi) as a substrate. This is a synthetic nanostructured material that contains high-aspect-ratio nano-protrusions, such as spikes or needles, on the Si surface produced via plasma etching. We now show that coating a bSi surface composed of 15-μm-high needles conformably with BDD produces a robust electrochemical electrode with high sensitivity and high electroactive area. A clinically relevant demonstration of the efficacy of these electrodes is shown by measuring their sensitivity for detection of dopamine (DA) in the presence of an excess of uric acid (UA). Finally, the nanostructured surface of bSi has recently been found to generate a mechanical bactericidal effect, killing both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria at high rates. We will show that BDD-coated bSi also acts as an effective antibacterial surface, with the added advantage that being diamond-coated it is far more robust and less likely to become damaged than Si.

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    Rights statement: This is the final published version of the article (version of record). It first appeared online via RSC at http://pubs.rsc.org/en/Content/ArticleLanding/2016/TB/C6TB01774F#!divAbstract. Please refer to any applicable terms of use of the publisher.

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