Didactic subtitling in the Foreign Language (FL) classroom. Improving language skills through task-based practice and Form-Focused Instruction (FFI)

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

Didactic subtitling is a relatively new area of investigation that is undergoing a surge in popularity. By bringing together findings from Audiovisual Translation (AVT), Second Language Acquisition (SLA) and psycholinguistics, some theoretical issues related to the practice of subtitle creation in Foreign Language Learning (FLL) are appraised. The article introduces Task-Based Learning and Teaching (TBLT) and reflects on what didactic subtitling can and cannot offer to TBLT approaches. In a still predominantly communicative era, language researchers are questioning the effectiveness of entirely communicative approaches to FLL. Many support the idea that, if successful learning is to be achieved, some Form-Focused Instruction (FFI) is needed. This article reviews relevant FFI literature, and explores how far active subtitling can provide an effective strategy for focussing on form that leads to communicative language development. In doing so, concepts such as noticing, skill development, interaction, pushed output and consciousness-raising are addressed. It is argued that a combination of task-based and form-focused instruction in the subtitling classroom can have great potential and should be investigated further, both theoretically and empirically.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)9-29
Number of pages20
JournalTranslation and Translanguaging in Multilingual Contexts
Volume4
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • audiovisual translation
  • task-based learning and teaching
  • form-focused instruction
  • didactic subtitling
  • foreign language learning

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