Differential remodelling of peroxisome function underpins the environmental and metabolic adaptability of diplonemids and kinetoplastids

Jorge Morales, Muneaki Hashimoto, Tom Williams, Hiroko Hirawake-Mogi, Takashi Makiuchi, Akiko Tsubouchi, Naoko Kaga, Hikari Taka, Tsutomu Fujimura, Masato Koike, Toshihiro Mita, Frédéric Bringaud, Juan L. Concepción, Tetsuo Hashimoto, T. Martin Embley, Takeshi Nara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

The remodelling of organelle function is increasingly appreciated as a central driver of eukaryotic biodiversity and evolution. Kinetoplastids including Trypanosoma and Leishmania have evolved specialised peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Glycosomes uniquely contain a glycolytic pathway as well as other enzymes, which underpin the physiological flexibility of these major human
pathogens. The sister group of kinetoplastids are the diplonemids, which are among the most abundant eukaryotes in marine plankton. Here we demonstrate the compartmentalisation of gluconeogenesis, or glycolysis in reverse, in the peroxisomes of the free-living marine diplonemid, Diplonema papillatum. Our results suggest that peroxisome modification was already underway in the common ancestor of kinetoplastids and diplonemids, and raise the possibility that the central importance of gluconeogenesis to carbon metabolism in the
heterotrophic free-living ancestor may have been an important selective driver. Our data indicate that peroxisome modification is not confined to the kinetoplastid lineage, but has also been a factor in the success of their free-living euglenozoan relatives.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages9
JournalProceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
Volume283
Issue number1830
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 May 2016

Keywords

  • organelle evolution
  • metabolic compartmentalisation
  • peroxisomes
  • glycolysis
  • diplonemids
  • kinetoplastids

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