Discontinuity of care: Is it undermining our response to domestic violence and abuse?

Katherine Pitt*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate (Academic Journal)peer-review

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Abstract

Domestic violence and abuse (DVA) is common and destructive, but tragically under-detected in primary care. DVA is relevant to healthcare professionals because it corrodes the physical and mental health of those affected. The impact of DVA is trans-generational, damaging the life chances of affected children. People affected by abuse are more likely to be in contact with the health service than any other agency.

A study of women attending general practices in East London found that 41% had experienced physical or sexual violence in their lifetime and 17% in the past year.1 Survivors identify doctors as individuals they would disclose to, and GPs can be a crucial source of support.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages1
JournalBritish Journal of General Practice
Volume68
Issue number672
Early online date28 Jun 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2018

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