Disorder-specific versus generic cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety disorders in children and young people: a systematic narrative review of evidence for the effectiveness of disorder-specific CBT compared with the disorder-generic treatment, Coping Cat

Rose Oldham-Cooper*, Maria Loades

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
224 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background: Coping Cat (CC), a generic cognitive-behavioral intervention for anxiety disorders in children and young people, is recommended in the United Kingdom for social anxiety disorder (SAD), generalized anxiety disorder, separation anxiety (SA), and specific phobias (SP), with disorder-specific approaches generally favored in treatment of anxiety disorders in adults. Objectives: To compare CC with disorder-specific cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) interventions based on anxiety-related treatment outcomes. Study Selection: Primary research articles describing treatment of children and young people aged 7–17 for SAD, generalized anxiety disorder, SA, and SP, using CC or disorder-specific CBT. Results: Ten studies implemented CC and four implemented disorder-specific CBT. One study compared CC with a disorder-specific approach. There was a lack of data to support use of CC in treatment of SPs. However, CC was equally effective as disorder-specific treatments for SA and SAD. Conclusions: A lack of data exists for disorder-specific CBT interventions compared to CC.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)6-17
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatric Nursing
Volume30
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 May 2017

Keywords

  • Anxiety disorder
  • child and adolescent
  • cognitive-behavioral therapy
  • Coping Cat
  • disorder specific

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