Displaying genuineness: cultural translation in the drafting of marriage narratives for immigration applications and appeals

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

13 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article uses Finch's (2007) idea of 'display' to analyse the process in which autobiographical statements for family immigration applications and appeals are drafted in the United Kingdom. I argue that legal representatives play a key role in 'translating culture' (Good, 2011) in relation to both content and form, a process that is driven primarily by the need to demonstrate compatibility with the cultural assumptions of ethnocentrically conceived Immigration Rules. These rules act as 'moral gatekeepers' (Wray, 2006) to set limits on the conceptual structure of 'family' and to outline what a 'genuine' marital relationship looks like, thereby excluding cultural Others. The findings show that legal representatives translate the experiences, norms and values of their clients' relationships using authorial devices to make the account ring true within a commonsense understanding of British culture. I suggest that legal representatives thus contribute to a successful outcome for those lacking in cultural capital.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)271-286
Number of pages16
JournalFamilies, Relationships and Societies
Volume3
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2014

Structured keywords

  • Migration Mobilities Bristol
  • migration
  • mobility
  • marriage
  • SPAIS Centre for the Study of Ethnicity and Citizenship

Keywords

  • FAMILY
  • immigration
  • narrative
  • MARRIAGE
  • Display

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