Diurnal cortisol patterns are associated with physical performance in the Caerphilly Prospective Study

Michael P Gardner, Stafford L Lightman, John Gallacher, Rebecca Hardy, Diana Kuh, Shah Ebrahim, Antony Bayer, Yoav Ben-Shlomo, the HALCyon Study Team

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Cross-sectional studies have suggested that elevated cortisol is associated with worse physical performance, a surrogate of ageing. We examined the relationship between repeat cortisol measures over 20 years and physical performance in later life. Methods: Middle-aged men (45–59 years) were recruited between 1979 and 1983 (Phase 1) from the Caerphilly Prospective Study (CaPS) and re-examined 20 years later at 65–83 years of age(Phase 5). Participants included 750 and 898 subjects with either Phase 1 and/or Phase 5 data on exposure and outcomes. Outcome measures were walking speed and balance time and exposures included morning fasting serum cortisol (Phase 1) and four salivary samples on 2 consecutive days (Phase 5). Results: Faster walking speed was associated with higher morning cortisol at Phase 1 [coefficient per standard deviation (SD) increase 0.68,95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.09–1.27; P=0.02] though this was attenuated after adjustment for covariates (coefficient per SD increase 0.45; 95% CI –0.16 to 1.07; P=0.15). Higher night-time cortisol at Phase 5 was associated with slower speed (coefficient per SD increase –1.06; 95% CI –1.60 to –0.52; P
Translated title of the contributionDiurnal cortisol patterns are associated with physical performance in the Caerphilly Prospective Study
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1693 - 1702
Number of pages10
JournalInternational Journal of Epidemiology
Volume40
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2011

Keywords

  • Mobility Limitation
  • Hydrocortisone
  • Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System
  • Humans
  • Aging
  • Walking
  • Aged
  • Body Mass Index
  • Pituitary-Adrenal System
  • Postural Balance
  • Smoking
  • Prospective Studies
  • Circadian Rhythm
  • Aged, 80 and over
  • Middle Aged
  • Saliva
  • Male

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