Diurnal variation in the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of the male rat to noise stress

HC Atkinson, SA Wood, YM Kershaw, E Bate, SL Lightman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Basal activity of the rat hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is highly dynamic and displays both circadian and ultradian rhythmicity in corticosterone secretion. This study investigated the relationship between basal corticosterone pulsatility and the corticosterone response to noise during the early light phase when there are no endogenous corticosterone pulses and during the early dark phase when there are hourly pulses of corticosterone. An automated blood sampling system was used to collect blood in conscious male rats at 5-min intervals before, during and after exposure to 10-min periods of white noise (104 dB). Behavioural responses to noise were also monitored during these periods. During the early light phase (morning), there was a consistent corticosteroid response to noise with corticosterone concentrations rising rapidly and reaching peak values 10–15 min after the noise had ceased, following which circulating concentrations declined at a rate comparable to the hormones half-life. A second noise stress, 80 min later, resulted in adaptation of the corticosterone response. During the early dark phase (evening), the corticosterone response to the noise was similar to that seen in the morning, although there was no adaptation to a second stimulus. During the evening, the inhibition of endogenous HPA activity after the sound was limited to 40 min following stress.
Translated title of the contributionDiurnal variation in the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis of the male rat to noise stress
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)526 - 533
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Neuroendocrinology
Volume18 (7)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2006

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Blackwell

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