Dodged Debts and the Submissive Predator: Perspectives on Amazonian Relations of Dependence

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Abstract

This article explores the nature of inter-ethnic asymmetry and the dynamic of long-term dependence in Amazonia. Drawing on the case of the Sanema and their neighbouring Ye’kwana, it seeks to gain a deeper understanding of submission and indebtedness with a view to rethinking where the power might lie in such relationships. The association between the two groups, I argue, is motivated by the Sanema’s pursuit of manufactured items, access to which the Ye’kwana had historically monopolized. The dynamic entered into in order to procure these goods is one of voluntary deference on the part of the Sanema, a demeanour that is actively pursued because it enables morally valued autonomy and a freedom from ongoing reciprocity. I conclude that this ‘submissive extraction’ can offer new perspectives on the relationship between debt, predation, and freedom.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)320-337
JournalJournal of the Royal Anthropological Institute
Volume23
Issue number2
Early online date5 Apr 2017
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 May 2017

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