Does word length affect speech onset latencies in single word production?

MFE Damian, JS Bowers, H Stadthagen-Gonzalez, K Spalek

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

18 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Most models of spoken production predict that shorter utterances should be initiated faster than longer ones. However, whether word-length effects in single word production exist is at present controversial.A series of experiments did not find evidence for such an effect. First, an experimental manipulation of
word length in picture naming showed no latency differences. Second, Dutch and English speakers named 2 sets of either objects or words (monosyllabic names in Dutch and disyllabic names in English or vice versa). A length effect, which should manifest itself as an interaction between object set and response language, emerged in word naming but not in picture naming. Third, distractors consisting of the final syllable of disyllabic object names speeded up responses, but at the same time, no word-length effect was found. These results suggest that before the response is initiated, an entire word has been phonologically encoded, but only its initial syllable is placed in an articulatory buffer.
Translated title of the contributionDoes word length affect speech onset latencies in single word production?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)892 - 905
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Learning, Memory, and Cognition
Volume36
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2010

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