"Du wagst es, meine Worte zu deuten?" Unreliable Evidence on Schiller's Stage

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

This article examines Schiller's use of documents on stage in 'Wallenstein' and 'Maria Stuart', arguing that his engagement with sources as a historian decisively influenced his treatment of writing in the dramas. The problems he encountered as a historian he translated into the theatre, where characters, and occasionally even the audience, are unsure of the written word’s validity. Sight is considered as an alternative to writing, but is also found to be unreliable. Finally, Schiller's notion of the sublime ('das Erhabene') is shown to have turned the impossibility of certain factual knowledge into a virtue.
Translated title of the contribution"Du wagst es, meine Worte zu deuten?" Unreliable Evidence on Schiller's Stage
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)779 - 796
Number of pages18
JournalModern Language Review
Volume106
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2011

Structured keywords

  • Institute of Greece, Rome, and the Classical Tradition

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