Dymanics of Neisseria meningitidis interactions with human cellular barriers and immune effectors

NJE Griffiths, C Sa E Cunha, I Murillo, A-R Youssef, E Borodina, DJ Hill, M Virji

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane (OM) adhesins, Opa and Opc are known to exert significant influence on bacterial adhesion and invasion properties. They are also likely to affect the dynamics of cellular barrier penetration as they target human receptors that are subject to upregulation under inflammatory conditions. As some of the targeted receptors are also expressed on immune cells, it is possible that the OM proteins, when presented on bacteria or in OM vesicle vaccines, have the additional capacity to modulate host immune responses. In our recent studies, in vitro model systems were used to further explore these possibilities. The studies illustrated that the major human receptors targeted by Opa and Opc, i.e. CEACAMs and integrins, when upregulated by inflammatory cytokines, encourage enhanced cellular adhesion, invasion and barrier traversal. Tissue infiltration by fully capsulate bacteria via Opa proteins was also observed for piliated Opa+ meningococci. Other studies indicate that Opc increases meningococcal resistance to serum-mediated killing by binding to the complement regulatory molecule vitronectin. In addition, although adverse immunomodulatory effects have been reported for Opa-expressing gonococci and meningococcal OMVs, our studies indicate that interactions with CD4+ T cell expressed CEACAM1 does not offer immunomodulatory properties to meningococci.
Translated title of the contributionDymanics of Neisseria meningitidis interactions with human cellular barriers and immune effectors
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)88 - 90
Number of pages3
JournalVaccimonitor
Volume18
Publication statusPublished - May 2009

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