Early life predictors of adolescent smoking: findings from the Mater-University Study of Pregnancy and its outcomes

DA Lawlor, MJ O'Callaghan, AA Mamun, GM Williams, W Bor, JM Najman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we have examined the early life predictors of smoking at age 14 in a birth cohort of individuals born in Brisbane, Australia between 1981 and 1984. In stratified and multivariable analyses maternal smoking throughout pregnancy and when the child was aged 14 were both associated with the child smoking: fully adjusted odds ratio [95% confidence interval] comparing maternal smoking throughout pregnancy with never smoking was 1.40 [1.25, 1.65] and that comparing maternal smoking when the child was aged 14 with not smoking was 1.57 [1.19, 2.06]. The association of maternal smoking throughout pregnancy was specific for adolescent smoking and was not associated with alcohol consumption, TV viewing or self-report of poor school performance at age 14. Maternal and paternal educational attainment were also associated with smoking at age 14, with these associations attenuating towards the null with adjustment for childhood behavioural problems and cognitive function. There was no association of family income with smoking at age 14 once other explanatory variables were taken into account.
Translated title of the contributionEarly life predictors of adolescent smoking: findings from the Mater-University Study of Pregnancy and its outcomes
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)377 - 387
Number of pages11
JournalPaediatric and Perinatal Epidemiology
Volume19(5)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2005

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