Echolocation calls, wing shape, diet and phylogenetic diagnosis of the endemic Chinese bat Myotis pequinius

G Jones, S Parsons, S Zhang, B Stadelmann, P Benda, M Ruedi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe the echolocation calls, flight morphology and diet of the endemic Chinese bat Myotis pequinius Thomas, 1908. Orientation calls are broadband, and reach low terminal frequencies. Diet comprised 80% beetles by volume. Wing shape and call design suggest that the bats fly in cluttered habitats, and the possession of moderately long ears and the dietary composition imply they forage at least sometimes by gleaning. Myotis pequinius resembles a larger Oriental version of the western Palaearctic species M. nattereri. Phylogenetic analysis based on sequences of the cytochrome b gene of mitochondrial DNA (1,140 base pairs) from a range of Palaearctic Myotis species confirmed that M. pequinius is close to the nattereri group, and is a sister-species to the eastern Palaearctic M. bombinus. One bat sequenced from China could not be identified from available species descriptions. It was smaller than M. pequinius, and also differed from it in sequence divergence by 6.7%, suggesting the existence of additional, cryptic taxonomic diversity in this group. Our phylogenetic analysis also supports the recognition of M. schaubi as a species distinct from M. nattereri in Transcaucasia and south-western Asia. Myotis nattereri tschuliensis is more closely related to M. schaubi than to M. nattereri, and is best considered either as a subspecies of M. schaubi, or possibly as a distinct species.
Translated title of the contributionEcholocation calls, wing shape, diet and phylogenetic diagnosis of the endemic Chinese bat Myotis pequinius
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)451 - 463
Number of pages13
JournalActa Chiropterologica
Volume8 (2)
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2006

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Museum and Institute of Zoology, Polish Academy of Sciences

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