Ecohydrological controls on apparent rates of peat carbon accumulation in a boreal bog record from the Hudson Bay Lowlands, northern Ontario, Canada

Marissa A. Davies, Jerome Blewett, B D A Naafs, Sarah A. Finkelstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

A multiproxy Holocene record from a bog in the Hudson Bay Lowlands, northern Ontario, Canada, was used to evaluate how ecohydrology relates to carbon accumulation. The study site is located at a somewhat higher elevation and on coarser grained deposits than the surrounding peatlands. This promotes better drainage and thus a slower rate of carbon accumulation relative to sites with similar initiation age. The rate of peat vertical accretion was initially low as the site transitioned from a marsh to a rich fen. These lower rates took place during the warmer temperatures of the Holocene thermal maximum, confirming the importance of hydrological 2 controls limiting peat accretion at the local scale. Testate amoebae, pollen, and plant macrofossils indicate a transition to a poor fen and then a bog during the late Holocene, as the carbon accumulation rate and reconstructed water table depth increased. The bacterial membrane lipid biomarker indices used to infer paleotemperature show a summer temperature bias and appear sensitive to changes in peat type. The bacterial membrane lipid biomarker pH proxy indicates a rich to a poor fen and a subsequent fen to bog transition, which are supported by pollen, macrofossil, and testate amoeba records.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-14
JournalQuaternary Research
Early online date29 Apr 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 29 Apr 2021

Keywords

  • Peatland
  • Paleoecology
  • Carbon accumulation
  • Pollen
  • Macrofossils
  • Testate amoebae
  • Biomarkers
  • brGDGTs
  • Holocene

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