Effect of communicating phenotypic and genetic risk of coronary heart disease alongside web-based lifestyle advice: the INFORM Randomised Controlled Trial

Barbora Silarova*, Stephen J Sharp, Juliet A Usher-Smith, Joanne Lucas , Rupert Payne, Guy Shefer , Carmel Moore , Christine Girling , Kathryn Lawrence , Zoe Tolkien , Matthew Walker, Adam S Butterworth , Emanuele Di Angelantonio , John Danesh , Simon J Griffin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

9 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Objective: To determine whether provision of web-based lifestyle advice and coronary heart disease risk information either based on phenotypic characteristics or phenotypic plus genetic characteristics affects changes in objectively measured health behaviours.
Methods: A parallel-group, open randomised trial including 956 male and female blood donors with no previous history of cardiovascular disease (mean [SD] age = 56.7 [8.8] years) randomised to four study groups: control group (no information provided); web-based lifestyle advice only (lifestyle group); lifestyle advice plus information on estimated 10-year coronary heart disease risk based on phenotypic characteristics (phenotypic risk estimate) (phenotypic group); and lifestyle advice plus information on estimated 10-year coronary heart disease risk based on phenotypic (phenotypic risk estimate) and genetic characteristics (genetic risk estimate) (genetic group). The primary outcome was change in physical activity from baseline to 12 weeks assessed by wrist-worn accelerometer.
Results: 928 (97.1%) participants completed the trial. There was no evidence of intervention effects on physical activity (difference in adjusted mean change from baseline): lifestyle group vs control group 0.09 milligravity (mg) (95%CI: -1.15 to 1.33); genetic group vs phenotypic group -0.33 mg (-1.55 to 0.90); phenotypic group and genetic group vs control group -0.52 mg (-1.59 to 0.55); and vs lifestyle group -0.61 mg (-1.67 to 0.46). There was no evidence of intervention effects on secondary biological, emotional and health-related behavioural outcomes except self-reported fruit and vegetable intake.
Conclusions: Provision of risk information, whether based on phenotypic or genotypic characteristics, alongside web-based lifestyle advice did not importantly affect objectively measured levels of physical activity, other health-related behaviours, biological risk factors or emotional well-being.
Clinical Trial Registration: Current Controlled Trials ISRCTN17721237. Prospectively registered 12 January 2015. http://www.isrctn.com/ISRCTN17721237.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)982-989
Number of pages8
JournalHeart
Volume105
Issue number13
Early online date14 Jun 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jul 2019

Bibliographical note

© Author(s) (or their employer(s)) 2019. Re-use permitted under CC BY-NC. No commercial re-use. See rights and permissions. Published by BMJ.

Keywords

  • cardiovascular disease
  • risk reduction behaviour
  • risk assessment
  • primary prevention
  • genetics

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