Effect of surface compensation for imaging through doubly-curved surfaces using a 2D phased array

Jessica G. McKee, Paul D. Wilcox*, Robert E. Malkin

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference Contribution (Conference Proceeding)

1 Citation (Scopus)
34 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

In order to characterise and size defects located beneath complex surface geometries in components when using ultrasonic non-destructive testing methods, correct surface compensation is of critical importance when generating images. The effect of the accuracy of surface compensation when generating Total Focusing Method (TFM) images through a doubly-curved surface with a 128-element sparse 2D phased array has been investigated. An aluminium test specimen was created with an axi-symmetric surface with a Gaussian profile in order to create a surface that curves in multiple directions. By determining the resolution of a defect for different assumed surface profiles, it has been shown that an extracted surface works best when compared to a planar surface parallel to the array and a 2D fitted planar surface. The results show that, even for surfaces that are curved very slightly, incorrect surface compensation can lead to significant image de-focusing.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication45th Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation, Volume 38
EditorsSimon Laflamme, Stephen Holland, Leonard J. Bond
PublisherAmerican Institute of Physics (AIP)
Number of pages9
Volume2102
Edition38
ISBN (Electronic)9780735418325
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 May 2019
Event45th Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation, QNDE 2018 - Burlington, United States
Duration: 15 Jul 201819 Jul 2018

Conference

Conference45th Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation, QNDE 2018
CountryUnited States
CityBurlington
Period15/07/1819/07/18

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