Effect of temperature on the rise in intracellular sodium caused by calcium depletion in ferret ventricular muscle and the mechanism of the alleviation of the calcium paradox by hypothermia

M S Suleiman, R A Chapman

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

    27 Citations (Scopus)

    Abstract

    The effects of temperature over the range 37-10 degrees C on the responses of isolated ferret ventricular trabeculae to the depletion and repletion of bathing calcium has been investigated. Cooling is found to reduce the rate of rise of intracellular sodium activity (measured with an ion-sensitive microelectrode) induced by depletion of bathing divalent cations, without affecting the prolonged depolarization. The rate of rise of [Na]i (with the sodium pump inhibited) shows a dependence on temperature (energy of activation, 67 kJ.mol-1; Q10, 2.3-2.8) that increases with increasing temperature. This contrasts with previously published data for the sodium pump for which the temperature dependence falls with increasing temperature. These results offer an explanation for the alleviation of the calcium paradox caused by cooling during the period of calcium depletion, which is similar to other procedures that offer protection by limiting the rise in [Na]i by having effects on the L-type calcium channel.

    Original languageEnglish
    Pages (from-to)1238-46
    Number of pages9
    JournalCirculation Research
    Volume67
    Issue number5
    Publication statusPublished - Nov 1990

    Keywords

    • Animals
    • Biological Transport, Active
    • Calcium
    • Calcium Channels
    • Ferrets
    • Heart
    • Hypothermia, Induced
    • In Vitro Techniques
    • Membrane Potentials
    • Microelectrodes
    • Myocardium
    • Sodium
    • Temperature
    • Ventricular Function
    • Comparative Study
    • Journal Article
    • Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

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