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Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence

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Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence. / Grzeda, Mariusz Tadeusz; Heron, Jon; von Gontard, Alexander; Joinson, Carol.

In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Vol. 26, No. 6, 06.2017, p. 649-658.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Harvard

Grzeda, MT, Heron, J, von Gontard, A & Joinson, C 2017, 'Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence', European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 649-658. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-016-0928-0

APA

Grzeda, M. T., Heron, J., von Gontard, A., & Joinson, C. (2017). Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, 26(6), 649-658. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-016-0928-0

Vancouver

Grzeda MT, Heron J, von Gontard A, Joinson C. Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence. European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 2017 Jun;26(6):649-658. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00787-016-0928-0

Author

Grzeda, Mariusz Tadeusz ; Heron, Jon ; von Gontard, Alexander ; Joinson, Carol. / Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence. In: European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. 2017 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 649-658.

Bibtex

@article{c88b02635baf47aeb29b1426109866fb,
title = "Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence",
abstract = "Objective: To examine whether daytime wetting and bedwetting (urinary incontinence: UI) in childhood and adolescence are associated with psychosocial problems in adolescence. Method: We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to examine the association between trajectories of UI from 4–9 years and self-reported psychosocial problems in adolescence (13-14 years) including depressive symptoms, peer victimization, poor self-image and school experiences (negative perception of school and teachers, problems with peer relationships). Sample sizes ranged from 5,162 (perception of teachers) to 5,887 (self-image). We also examined associations between self-reported UI at 14 years and psychosocial problems. Results: Relative to normative development, adolescents who experienced delayed development of bladder control had poorer self-image (standardized mean difference= 0.18 [95{\%} CI= 0.04, 0.32]), more negative perceptions of school (0.18 [0.02, 0.34]) and more problems with peer relationships at school (0.25 [0.10, 0.40]). Persistent wetting (bedwetting with daytime wetting) in childhood was associated with increased problems with peer relationships in adolescence (0.19 [0.03, 0.34]). The strongest associations between adolescent UI and psychosocial problems were found for daytime wetting (reference= no UI at 14 years): depressive symptoms (OR= 3.04 [95{\%} CI: 1.91-4.84]), peer victimization (2.14 [1.48-3.10]), poor self-image (t=-8.49, p<0.001) and problems with peer relationships (t=-4.69, p<0.001). Conclusions: Children with delayed development of bladder control and persistent wetting have increased psychosocial problems in adolescence. Adolescents with UI reported a range of psychosocial problems and clinicians should be aware that they might require support from psychological services.",
keywords = "Psychosocial problems, adolescence, urinary incontinence, cohort study, ALSPAC",
author = "Grzeda, {Mariusz Tadeusz} and Jon Heron and {von Gontard}, Alexander and Carol Joinson",
year = "2017",
month = "6",
doi = "10.1007/s00787-016-0928-0",
language = "English",
volume = "26",
pages = "649--658",
journal = "European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry",
issn = "1018-8827",
publisher = "Springer Verlag",
number = "6",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Effects of urinary incontinence on psychosocial outcomes in adolescence

AU - Grzeda, Mariusz Tadeusz

AU - Heron, Jon

AU - von Gontard, Alexander

AU - Joinson, Carol

PY - 2017/6

Y1 - 2017/6

N2 - Objective: To examine whether daytime wetting and bedwetting (urinary incontinence: UI) in childhood and adolescence are associated with psychosocial problems in adolescence. Method: We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to examine the association between trajectories of UI from 4–9 years and self-reported psychosocial problems in adolescence (13-14 years) including depressive symptoms, peer victimization, poor self-image and school experiences (negative perception of school and teachers, problems with peer relationships). Sample sizes ranged from 5,162 (perception of teachers) to 5,887 (self-image). We also examined associations between self-reported UI at 14 years and psychosocial problems. Results: Relative to normative development, adolescents who experienced delayed development of bladder control had poorer self-image (standardized mean difference= 0.18 [95% CI= 0.04, 0.32]), more negative perceptions of school (0.18 [0.02, 0.34]) and more problems with peer relationships at school (0.25 [0.10, 0.40]). Persistent wetting (bedwetting with daytime wetting) in childhood was associated with increased problems with peer relationships in adolescence (0.19 [0.03, 0.34]). The strongest associations between adolescent UI and psychosocial problems were found for daytime wetting (reference= no UI at 14 years): depressive symptoms (OR= 3.04 [95% CI: 1.91-4.84]), peer victimization (2.14 [1.48-3.10]), poor self-image (t=-8.49, p<0.001) and problems with peer relationships (t=-4.69, p<0.001). Conclusions: Children with delayed development of bladder control and persistent wetting have increased psychosocial problems in adolescence. Adolescents with UI reported a range of psychosocial problems and clinicians should be aware that they might require support from psychological services.

AB - Objective: To examine whether daytime wetting and bedwetting (urinary incontinence: UI) in childhood and adolescence are associated with psychosocial problems in adolescence. Method: We used data from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children to examine the association between trajectories of UI from 4–9 years and self-reported psychosocial problems in adolescence (13-14 years) including depressive symptoms, peer victimization, poor self-image and school experiences (negative perception of school and teachers, problems with peer relationships). Sample sizes ranged from 5,162 (perception of teachers) to 5,887 (self-image). We also examined associations between self-reported UI at 14 years and psychosocial problems. Results: Relative to normative development, adolescents who experienced delayed development of bladder control had poorer self-image (standardized mean difference= 0.18 [95% CI= 0.04, 0.32]), more negative perceptions of school (0.18 [0.02, 0.34]) and more problems with peer relationships at school (0.25 [0.10, 0.40]). Persistent wetting (bedwetting with daytime wetting) in childhood was associated with increased problems with peer relationships in adolescence (0.19 [0.03, 0.34]). The strongest associations between adolescent UI and psychosocial problems were found for daytime wetting (reference= no UI at 14 years): depressive symptoms (OR= 3.04 [95% CI: 1.91-4.84]), peer victimization (2.14 [1.48-3.10]), poor self-image (t=-8.49, p<0.001) and problems with peer relationships (t=-4.69, p<0.001). Conclusions: Children with delayed development of bladder control and persistent wetting have increased psychosocial problems in adolescence. Adolescents with UI reported a range of psychosocial problems and clinicians should be aware that they might require support from psychological services.

KW - Psychosocial problems

KW - adolescence

KW - urinary incontinence

KW - cohort study

KW - ALSPAC

U2 - 10.1007/s00787-016-0928-0

DO - 10.1007/s00787-016-0928-0

M3 - Article

C2 - 27943057

VL - 26

SP - 649

EP - 658

JO - European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

JF - European Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

SN - 1018-8827

IS - 6

ER -