Embedded figures detection in autism and typical development: Preliminary evidence of a double dissociation in relationships with visual search

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

81 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Individuals with autism show relatively strong performance on tasks that require them to identify the constituent parts of a visual stimulus. This is assumed to be the result of a bias towards processing the local elements in a display that follows from a weakened ability to integrate information at the global level. The results of the current study showed that, among children with autism, ability to locate a figure embedded in a larger stimulus was only related to performance on visual search trials where the target was identified by a unique perceptual feature. In contrast, control children's embedded figures performance was specifically related to their performance on visual search trials where the target was defined by a conjunction of features. This double dissociation suggests that enhanced performance on perceptual tasks by children with autism is not simply a consequence of a quantitative difference in ability to engage in global processing.
Translated title of the contributionEmbedded figures detection in autism and typical development: Preliminary evidence of a double dissociation in relationships with visual search
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)344 - 351
Number of pages18
JournalDevelopmental Science
Volume8
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jul 2005

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Blackwell Publishing

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