Emerging perspectives in the restoration of biodiversity-based ecosystem services

Daniel Montoya*, Lucy Rogers, Jane Memmott

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

144 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Given the large-scale anthropogenic alteration of natural habitats, ecological restoration is emerging as one of the most important disciplines in environmental science. Once habitats are physically restored, an important goal of restoration is to recover the ecosystem services provided by the diversity of species and their interactions (e.g., seed dispersal, pollination, pest control, and invasion resistance). However, current understanding of the ecological processes underlying this recovery is often incomplete and poorly integrated across different ecosystems. Here, we highlight recent conceptual findings in biodiversity ecosystem functioning, food-web theory, and metacommunity theory that are relevant to restoration. We also identify knowledge gaps that will contribute to moving restoration from a site- and situation-specific discipline to a more globally applicable science.

Original languageEnglish
Article number27(12)
Pages (from-to)666-672
Number of pages7
JournalTrends in Ecology and Evolution
Volume27
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

Keywords

  • PLANT-POLLINATOR NETWORKS
  • FOOD WEBS
  • ECOLOGICAL PROCESSES
  • LANDSCAPE STRUCTURE
  • DIVERSITY
  • COMMUNITIES
  • METAPOPULATION
  • MANAGEMENT
  • INVASION
  • CONSEQUENCES

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