The Rose of Rhodesia: colonial cinema as narrative fiction and ethnographic spectacle

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Abstract

This essay examines The Rose of Rhodesia as both romantic fiction and ethnographic spectacle. It discusses the film’s development of imperial heroes, Lord Cholmondeley and Jack Morel, and a colonial heroine, Rose Randall, and analyses the film’s ethnographic representations of the colonised Other. The paper shows how the film advances perspectives on the Christianising and civilising ethic of colonialism, within which the marriage of the hero and heroine ensures the reproduction of the desired colonial future.
Translated title of the contributionThe Rose of Rhodesia: colonial cinema as narrative fiction and ethnographic spectacle
Original languageEnglish
Article numberPart II
JournalScreening the Past
Volume25
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2009

Bibliographical note

Special Issue: Colonial Africa on the Silent Screen: Recovering The Rose of Rhodesia (1918)

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