English farmers’ wheat storage and sales in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries

Liam Brunt, Edmund Cannon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

Abstract

Harnessing previously unused farm inventories and corn books, we provide data on wheat storage and sales by English farmers, 1750-1850. Wheat was predominantly stored outdoors in thatched stacks (or “ricks”) – often for more than a year, sometimes for multiple years – although carryover volumes were generally small. Farm stocks tended to be threshed and sold evenly across the year to meet demand. Storage costs were low, and carried over wheat sold at a premium as the natural drying process raised its quality. Wheat was frequently sold directly to millers, bypassing the open market, but private sale prices tracked market prices closely.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEconomic History Review
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 3 Sep 2021

Keywords

  • grain storage
  • food supply
  • industrial revolution

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