Erosion of enamel by non-carbonated soft drinks with and without toothbrushing abrasion

CA Hemingway, DM Parker, M Addy, ME Barbour

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

67 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. To investigate how enamel loss due to erosion, and due to cycling of erosion and abrasion, depends on compositional parameters of soft drinks, and particularly whether the thickness of the erosive softened layer is a function of drink composition. Setting. University dental hospital research laboratory in the UK, 2004. Materials and methods. Six drinks were chosen based on their popularity and composition: apple juice, orange juice, apple drink, orange drink, cranberry drink and 'ToothKind' blackcurrant drink. Group A samples (n = 36) were exposed to soft drinks at 36°C for six consecutive 10 minute periods. Group B samples (n = 36) were subjected to alternating erosion and toothbrushing, repeated six times. Enamel loss was measured using optical profilometry. Results. Group A: significant enamel loss was seen for all drinks (p <0.001). Erosion was correlated with pH and calcium concentration but not phosphate concentration or titratable acidity. Group B: significant additional material loss due to toothbrush abrasion occurred with all drinks. Abrasive enamel loss differed between the drinks and was positively correlated with drink erosive potential. Conclusion. Enamel loss by erosion is exacerbated by subsequent abrasion. The amount of softened enamel removed by toothbrushing is a function of the chemical composition of the erosive medium.
Translated title of the contributionErosion of enamel by non-carbonated soft drinks with and without toothbrushing abrasion
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)447 - 450
Number of pages4
JournalBritish Dental Journal
Volume201 (7)
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2006

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Nature Publishing Group

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