Executive function deficits and the pretend play of children with autism: A research note

C Jarrold, J Boucher, PK Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

37 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The failure to produce pretend play seen in autism may arise from executive deficits associated with the syndrome. This experiment investigated the ability of children with autism to use various objects in pretence, the prediction being that they would have particular difficulty using props with a clear function (e.g. a pencil) to perform a different pretend function (e.g. to act as a toothbrush). However, children with autism were as likely as controls to select a prop with an inappropriate function from amongst other, nonfunctional props, suggesting that executive deficits of this particular kind cannot readily explain an absence of pretend play in autism.
Translated title of the contributionExecutive function deficits and the pretend play of children with autism: A research note
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1473 - 1482
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatry
Volume35
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Nov 1994

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