Experimental study of damage propagation in overheight compact tension tests

X Li, SR Hallett, MR Wisnom, N Zobeiry, R Vaziri, A Poursartip

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper describes an experimental investigation into progressive damage development in notched fibre-reinforced composites laminates. The Over-height Compact Tension (OCT) test captures the behaviour of laminates typical of large structures and permits the stable formation of a process zone ahead of the crack tip. This allows a study of the influence of sub-critical damage on progression of fibre failure. A range of lay-ups have been tested using dispersed and blocked plies in the thickness direction. The load vs. pin opening displacement (POD) curve is used to characterise the progressive failure of specimens. A number of interrupted tests were performed for each lay-up to capture the sub-critical damage process before the onset of fibre fracture. Results show that dispersed plies promote fibre failure and crack growth whilst blocked plies promote a larger amount of splitting and delamination which in turn causes a larger process zone and ultimately a tougher laminate. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Translated title of the contributionExperimental study of damage propagation in overheight compact tension tests
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1891-1899
Number of pages9
JournalComposites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing
Volume40
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2009
Event4th International Conference on Composites Testing and Model Indenification - Dayton
Duration: 20 Oct 200822 Oct 2008

Keywords

  • INTRALAMINAR FRACTURE-TOUGHNESS
  • Over-height Compact Tension test
  • NOTCHED COMPOSITES
  • Mechanical testing
  • Damage tolerance
  • Fracture
  • COMPUTED-TOMOGRAPHY
  • STRENGTH
  • FAILURE
  • Delamination

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