False Self-Employment, Autonomy and Regulating for Decent Work: Improving Working Conditions in the UK Stripping Industry

Katie Cruz, Kate Hardy, Professor Teela Sanders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)
484 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

A large-scale study of working conditions in UK-based strip dancing clubs reveals that dancers are against de facto self-employment as it is defined and practised by management, but in favour of de jure self-employment that ensures sufficient levels of autonomy and control in the workplace. While dancers could potentially seek ‘worker’ or ‘employee’ status within the existing legal framework, their strong identification with the label ‘self-employed’ and their desire for autonomy will likely inhibit these labour rights claims. We propose an alternative avenue for improving dancers’ working conditions, whereby self-employed dancers articulate their grievances as a demand for decent work, pursued through licensing agreements between clubs and local authorities and facilitated by collective organization.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)274-294
Number of pages21
JournalIndustrial Relations Journal
Volume55
Issue number2
Early online date1 Sep 2016
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2017

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