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Feasibility of Safe-Tea: a parent targeted intervention to prevent hot drink scalds in pre-school children

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Feasibility of Safe-Tea : a parent targeted intervention to prevent hot drink scalds in pre-school children. / Bennett, Verity; Hollen, Linda I; Quinn-Scoggins , Harriet; Emond, Alan M; Kemp, Alison.

In: Injury Prevention, Vol. 1, 21.01.2020, p. 31-41.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)

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Bennett, Verity ; Hollen, Linda I ; Quinn-Scoggins , Harriet ; Emond, Alan M ; Kemp, Alison. / Feasibility of Safe-Tea : a parent targeted intervention to prevent hot drink scalds in pre-school children. In: Injury Prevention. 2020 ; Vol. 1. pp. 31-41.

Bibtex

@article{e8690ed2e14540048e9791cc611114fe,
title = "Feasibility of Safe-Tea: a parent targeted intervention to prevent hot drink scalds in pre-school children",
abstract = "Objective Despite the high prevalence of preventable hot drink scalds in preschool children, there is a paucity of research on effective prevention interventions and a serious need to improve parents{\textquoteright} knowledge of first aid. This study investigates the feasibility of {\textquoteleft}Safe-Tea{\textquoteright}, an innovative multifaceted community-based intervention delivered by early-years practitioners.Methods {\textquoteleft}Safe-Tea{\textquoteright} was implemented at Childcare, Stay&Play and Home Visit settings in areas of deprivation in Cardiff, UK. A mixed-methods approach was used, including preintervention and postintervention parent questionnaires and focus groups with parents and practitioners to test the acceptability, practicality and ability of staff to deliver the intervention, and parents{\textquoteright} knowledge and understanding.Results Intervention materials, activities and messages were well received and understood by both parents and community practitioners. Interactive and visual methods of communication requiring little to no reading were most acceptable. Parents{\textquoteright} understanding of the risk of hot drink scalds in preschool children and knowledge of appropriate first aid improved postintervention. Parents knew at baseline that they {\textquoteleft}should{\textquoteright} keep hot drinks out of reach. Focus group discussions after intervention revealed improved understanding of likelihood and severity of scald injury to children, which increased vigilance. Parents gained confidence to correct the behaviours of others at home and pass on first aid messages.Conclusion This feasibility study is a vital step towards the development of a robust, evidence-based behaviour change intervention model. Work is underway to refine intervention materials based on improvements suggested by parents, and test these more widely in communities across the UK.",
keywords = "behaviour change, burn, child, community, mixed methods",
author = "Verity Bennett and Hollen, {Linda I} and Harriet Quinn-Scoggins and Emond, {Alan M} and Alison Kemp",
year = "2020",
month = jan,
day = "21",
doi = "10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042921",
language = "English",
volume = "1",
pages = "31--41",
journal = "Injury Prevention",
issn = "1353-8047",
publisher = "BMJ Publishing Group",

}

RIS - suitable for import to EndNote

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feasibility of Safe-Tea

T2 - a parent targeted intervention to prevent hot drink scalds in pre-school children

AU - Bennett, Verity

AU - Hollen, Linda I

AU - Quinn-Scoggins , Harriet

AU - Emond, Alan M

AU - Kemp, Alison

PY - 2020/1/21

Y1 - 2020/1/21

N2 - Objective Despite the high prevalence of preventable hot drink scalds in preschool children, there is a paucity of research on effective prevention interventions and a serious need to improve parents’ knowledge of first aid. This study investigates the feasibility of ‘Safe-Tea’, an innovative multifaceted community-based intervention delivered by early-years practitioners.Methods ‘Safe-Tea’ was implemented at Childcare, Stay&Play and Home Visit settings in areas of deprivation in Cardiff, UK. A mixed-methods approach was used, including preintervention and postintervention parent questionnaires and focus groups with parents and practitioners to test the acceptability, practicality and ability of staff to deliver the intervention, and parents’ knowledge and understanding.Results Intervention materials, activities and messages were well received and understood by both parents and community practitioners. Interactive and visual methods of communication requiring little to no reading were most acceptable. Parents’ understanding of the risk of hot drink scalds in preschool children and knowledge of appropriate first aid improved postintervention. Parents knew at baseline that they ‘should’ keep hot drinks out of reach. Focus group discussions after intervention revealed improved understanding of likelihood and severity of scald injury to children, which increased vigilance. Parents gained confidence to correct the behaviours of others at home and pass on first aid messages.Conclusion This feasibility study is a vital step towards the development of a robust, evidence-based behaviour change intervention model. Work is underway to refine intervention materials based on improvements suggested by parents, and test these more widely in communities across the UK.

AB - Objective Despite the high prevalence of preventable hot drink scalds in preschool children, there is a paucity of research on effective prevention interventions and a serious need to improve parents’ knowledge of first aid. This study investigates the feasibility of ‘Safe-Tea’, an innovative multifaceted community-based intervention delivered by early-years practitioners.Methods ‘Safe-Tea’ was implemented at Childcare, Stay&Play and Home Visit settings in areas of deprivation in Cardiff, UK. A mixed-methods approach was used, including preintervention and postintervention parent questionnaires and focus groups with parents and practitioners to test the acceptability, practicality and ability of staff to deliver the intervention, and parents’ knowledge and understanding.Results Intervention materials, activities and messages were well received and understood by both parents and community practitioners. Interactive and visual methods of communication requiring little to no reading were most acceptable. Parents’ understanding of the risk of hot drink scalds in preschool children and knowledge of appropriate first aid improved postintervention. Parents knew at baseline that they ‘should’ keep hot drinks out of reach. Focus group discussions after intervention revealed improved understanding of likelihood and severity of scald injury to children, which increased vigilance. Parents gained confidence to correct the behaviours of others at home and pass on first aid messages.Conclusion This feasibility study is a vital step towards the development of a robust, evidence-based behaviour change intervention model. Work is underway to refine intervention materials based on improvements suggested by parents, and test these more widely in communities across the UK.

KW - behaviour change

KW - burn

KW - child

KW - community

KW - mixed methods

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85061630062&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042921

DO - 10.1136/injuryprev-2018-042921

M3 - Article (Academic Journal)

C2 - 30765457

VL - 1

SP - 31

EP - 41

JO - Injury Prevention

JF - Injury Prevention

SN - 1353-8047

ER -