Features of coated diamonds from the Snap Lake/King Lake kimberlite dyke, Slave craton, Canada, as revealed by optical topography

AP Yelisseyev, NP Pokhilenko, JW Steeds, DA Zedgenizov, VP Afanasiev

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Confocal photoluminescence (PL) and local absorption spectroscopy were used to study the types and spatial distribution of point defects in coated diamonds, the input of which is about 30% in the Snap Lake deposit, Canada. Nitrogen concentration is on the level of several hundreds of ppm in the core, with a nitrogen-poor layer in its outer part, whereas in the coat it is usually several times higher as a result of fast growth. Nitrogen defects in the core are strongly aggregated with N3. B and B'-forms dominating, whereas A-defects are typical of the coat. The rounded shape of the coated diamonds is a result of the combined effect of partial dissolution of the octahedral core and the "abnormal" growth of the coat, which produces a fibrous structure, Analysis of PL and PL excitation spectra showed that structureless yellow-green PL of the coat is likely to be due to nickel-nitrogen complexes with their fine structure broadened in the strain fields. The presence of irradiation/annealing products such as vacancies V-0 and nitrogen-vacancy complexes NV-, N2V2 shows that the diamonds studied have undergone post-growth ionizing irradiation with further low-temperature annealing in natural conditions.
Translated title of the contributionFeatures of coated diamonds from the Snap Lake/King Lake kimberlite dyke, Slave craton, Canada, as revealed by optical topography
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)83 - 97
Number of pages15
JournalLithos
Volume77
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Elsevier Science BV
Other identifier: Iss. 1-4

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