Flipped small group classes and peer marking: incentives, student participation, and performance in a quasi-experimental approach

Rabeya Khatoon*, Elinor Jones

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle (Academic Journal)peer-review

10 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This paper proposes a new way of flipping small group classes in quantitative courses by active reading and peer marking using the virtual learning environment. We aim to engage students in the learning material by attempting a problem followed by peer marking based on some given solution guideline before they are exposed to another similar
problem to solve during the small group classes. We design a
quasi-experiment to evaluate the effect of peer marking by introducing an incentive in one such problem set and not in the other. The solution to the class problem is to act as the ‘incentive’, to be released only to the participants of the peer assessment. Using the data of two units from two UK universities and ‘incentives’ as instrumental variables to
participation, our quantitative findings reveal the effect of participating in one more peer marking as a 3% increase in final marks on average. The qualitative analysis based on focus group discussions shows that the process increases student engagement, satisfaction, confidence and overall learning responsibility. The challenges often lie to establish a
clear understanding of the purpose and the process of peer marking to ensure student buy-in to the system.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages19
JournalAssessment and Evaluation in Higher Education
Early online date18 Oct 2021
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 18 Oct 2021

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2021 The Author(s). Published by Informa UK Limited, trading as Taylor & Francis Group.

Structured keywords

  • ECON CEPS Education
  • Education and Pedagogy
  • ECON Applied Economics

Keywords

  • Flipped classes
  • peer marking
  • incentives
  • quasi-experiment

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Flipped small group classes and peer marking: incentives, student participation, and performance in a quasi-experimental approach'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this