Gathering Evidence: Current ICT Use and Future Needs for Arts and Humanities Research

L Huxley, C Mullings, T Hodos, DR Jones

Research output: Book/ReportCommissioned report

Abstract

Gathering Evidence: Current ICT Use and Future Needs for Arts and Humanities Researchers presents the findings of a one-year project under the knowledge-gathering strand of the ARHC's ICT in the Arts and Humanities Research Programme. The project's aims were to: help understand researchers' current ICT use and capability; identify trends and gaps; highlight potential future needs and consider what, if any, added value ICT brings to the quality of research in the arts and humanities. Findings are based on responses to an online survey and a small number of case study interviews, as well as desktop research and analysis of earlier studies. Summary of recommendations: 1. Provide one or more mechanisms to aid communication, awareness-raising and collaboration (especially for sole/unfunded researchers), including exploration of the use of Web 2.0 technologies. 2. Create a single, readily-usable source of information about the research population and mechanisms for contact. 3. More detailed study of some aspects of our study, particularly in the area of training and support, and closer working with other organisations such as JISC to engage and support institutions in their infrastructure and support structures for arts and humanities research. 4. Discover more precise details of specialised training and skills acquirement needs for different disciplines. 5. Investigate whether problems identified particularly with access, storage and re-use of images and sound can be addressed through national or regional consortia or services.
Original languageEnglish
PublisherAHRC
Number of pages53
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2006

Bibliographical note

Publisher: Arts and Humanities Research Council

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